Eggshell Paint: Everything You Need to Know for Exterior Usage

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Ahh, eggshell paint–Our love for it runs deep.  It’s one of the most popular choices for exterior paint, and for good reason. It has a finish that is a pleasant compromise between flat paint and high sheen paint. It’s not too shiny and it’s not dull, making it a versatile option for nearly any type of material, from wood to stucco. Learn more about why we commonly suggest eggshell paint and everything you need to know for its exterior usage.

If you need help with selecting the best eggshell paint brand and color, brick&batten has got your back. We offer virtual exterior design services and provide realistic renderings, so you can see your project come to life before investing in all the time and materials. 

Eggshell Paint is a DIY Dream

If you’ve been perusing the brick&batten site or Googling the best paint for exteriors, there’s a good chance you’re already a fan of saving money and getting your hands a little dirty with a DIY project. And we’ve got good news for you–A gracefully forgiving paint type does exist, and it is indeed eggshell paint. It’s hard to find an exterior paint that glides on as smoothly and settles well on a wide range of materials.

Once eggshell paint bonds onto your home’s exterior, any signs of roller edges or brush strokes seem to magically disappear. In this case, all the credit seems to go to its subtle reflective finish that hides a multitude of imperfections. So if you’re hoping to paint your home’s exterior yourself or go with a low-budget painting company, we highly suggest opting for eggshell paint.

Bonus tip: dark paint colors tend to hide imperfections better than light paint, so pay attention to the paint’s LRV.

Best Practices for Applying Eggshell Paint on Exteriors

Generally, you can follow the same best practices for applying eggshell paint as you would for most other paint types. For a deep dive into what you need to know before you even pick up your paintbrush for an exterior paint project, check out our previous blog post on the subject. However, here are some additional pointers:

  • Paint when it is dry and warm: For most areas in the world, the summer tends to be the dry season, so we suggest tackling your exterior paint project during then for a safe bet. However, we admit that the weather is nicer in the fall and spring. So if getting super sweaty isn’t your thing and you don’t want to have a panic attack at the sight of your paint dripping down your house with the rain, start your project when there is a virtually 0% chance of precipitation during the day of your project and the following three days after.
  • Cleaning is key: This is one easily avoidable mistake that we hear of happening all too often. If you don’t properly clean your home’s siding or brick before painting, your paint might not adhere to it correctly. Even worse, it can get contaminate lighter paint colors like white and cause dark streaks.
  • Safety first: Painting your home’s exterior isn’t a one-person job. Always paint with a partner to spot you if you need to get on a ladder, and paint roller extension poles will be your best friend in this scenario. We promise that painting your home’s exterior isn’t as scary as it sounds if you have what you need. But if you have a historic home, you may have to take extra precautions thanks to lead paint.


Eggshell Paint vs High Gloss Paint

Eggshell Paint is Fairly Durable but Slightly Harder to Keep Clean

At brick&batten, we’re all about saving time and money, which is why we always recommend the most cost-effective and low maintenance options for exterior design projects. However, we balance practicability with aesthetics, and eggshell paint represents that happy balance. Eggshell paint is much more durable than flat paint, but not quite as durable as high gloss paint. But in our humble opinion, eggshell paint looks more flattering on a home than high gloss paint, because it shows less texture. Think of it like those forgiving blur filters on Instagram for your face, only for your home.

Eggshell paint should be able to handle a powerwash, but make sure to do a test patch on a low setting. Eggshell paint is more pigmented than glossy satin sheen, which means it has more coarse particles in it, so there are more crevices for dirt to hide in it. But rather than using a super high power wash setting, which can damage your paint, we suggest repeating the process if you aren’t satisfied with the results of the first cleaning.

Eggshell Paint is Cheaper than High Gloss Paint and Easier to Touch Up

As a general rule, the higher the sheen, the more expensive the paint, and more expensive doesn’t always mean better. High sheen paints can cost up to $2 more per gallon than eggshell paint, and if you’re painting a multi-story home, this number can add up quickly. Although high gloss paint is less likely to chip than eggshell paint, it’s harder to discreetly touch up with a patch paint job. This is because high gloss paint accentuates nearly every brushstroke.

The Bottom Line 

We love the look of eggshell paint for exterior home projects because it has just enough shine to keep it durable and clean out in the elements, but it isn’t so shiny that it reflects every ounce of sunshine to reveal each imperfection. However, we believe there is a time and place for glossier paint, and that is on your windowsills, as they are more susceptible to weather damage. Choosing eggshell paint is a cost-effective and safe choice for exterior paint.

Revere Pewter

Are you facing commitment issues with choosing an exterior paint color or type?  Our realistic renderings might be just the tie breaker you need. Contact us for more information on a brick&batten virtual exterior design.

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